Calling all Employers and Recruitment Tech’s – Anomaly with disability questioning

I’ve been applying for jobs recently and some forward thinking organisations are asking the full suite of diversity questions. Thank you to all of you.

However, me being me, I noticed something which could be evolved.

When answering if you have a disability, it’s a bit confusing when it comes to some mental illnesses.

The question is mainly along the lines of, “do you have a disability, when the term disability means you’re disabled under the Equality Act 2010 if you have a physical or mental impairment that has a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on your ability to do normal daily activities”, with a Yes or No option for answering.

In some cases however, specifically surrounding mental ill health, it’s not as clear cut as a Yes or No answer!

If someone has OCD, Depression, Bi-Polar Disorder and possibly other mental or physical impairments, the symptoms are not always present, and in some cases the illness or impairment can be pretty much 100% under control!

But even in these cases there will potentially be times when the symptoms present themselves and will have a ‘substantial’ and ‘long-term’ negative effect on one’s ability to do normal daily activities!

So what do you do? Do you answer ‘Yes’ even though your employer may never see any impact on your ability to do normal (gosh I really hate the word normal) daily activities, and potentially worry in the back of your mind that in the wrong hands that intel might be used negatively against you (stigma hasn’t been completely smashed yet), or do you answer ‘No’ and being the conscientious people we are, have that niggle in the back of your mind that you are in fact not answering honestly?

I personally think the answer is to include another answer selection which is, Yes, but controlled (or equivalent). In my book this covers all basis, and opens up an additional healthy line of conversation regarding the person’s health and how by managing the symptoms it has created additional experience, capability and resilience etc.

I’m sure others have an opinion on this so please comment and share so we can potentially influence change if indeed people agree change will add value.

All the very best.

Colin.

You could lose the 4th Industrial Revolution opportunity

Lord Holmes spoke eloquently on Wednesday at Tipping Point about the opportunity the 4th Industrial Revolution represents to British business.

But some of you are going to miss it because many businesses are working harder to take your talent, than you are working to keep it!

Humans are programmed to survive, so no matter how much AI, machine learning, robotics and everything else making the headlines affects people and business; humans will innovate, find a way, and progress. The one constant that will determine whether your business thrives or dives, is your people!

Therefore, you absolutely must keep your critical employees, and add to them, to take advantage of today’s ever evolving world of work! You also must embrace diversity to ensure you have the full range of perspectives, experience and differences in thinking, to exploit the pace of change, innovation and automation.

The world is awash with examples of recruiting excellence with the most advanced employer brand, attraction, selection and onboarding strategies, all designed to take your best people away from you!

And some companies are truly diverse which means they bake difference into every challenge and solution, which will naturally attract people with the brilliance their difference gives them.

These coincide with practices in other businesses that play into the hands of talent competitors, namely, restricting earnings, heaping on pressure, poor communication and treatment, sub-optimal supervision and management, inequality, poor working conditions and no consistent purpose and cause. Basically a sub-optimal employment ecosystem.

There are three types of businesses:

  1. Those that say people are their most important asset but don’t treat them as such.
  2. Those that say people are their most important asset, want to treat them all as such, but due to a lack of consistent governance, they don’t achieve it.
  3. Those that say people are their most important asset, and treat everyone as such.

You should know which type of business you are and which type of business you want to be.

You should know if you have an optimal resourcing strategy.

You should know if you have an optimal approach to diversity, inclusion and belonging.

You should know if you have created the perfect employment ecosystem aligned to achieving the business plan and retaining your critical talent.

If you score positively in each of the above you will thrive and capitalise from the 4th Industrial Revolution.

If you have any doubt whatsoever, please contact me, for an open and honest conversation and appraisal.

It would be a delight to support you to seize the opportunity the 4th Industrial Revolution brings.

Colin.

Fix your employment ecosystem and the very best people will flock to you!

Great people leave organisations because (in no particular order);

  • they don’t feel valued,
  • the commute and business travel requirements impact too heavily on life,
  • they don’t like/respect their boss,
  • working demands, conditions and environments are poor,
  • the business lacks purpose and cause,
  • treatment and behaviours are unacceptable.

So fix all of this (your employment ecosystem) and you will fix your retention and productivity issues, and I’ll come on to why you will also fix any attraction issues in a bit! Easy huh! No, not easy at all because many of the processes and tools you can use to identify where these issues exist and in what doses, in order to apply corrective action, are traditionally subjective!

Answer me this! If you were working in an organisation going through major change or overhead reduction, or you felt you were being treated unfairly, plus you have a young family, meaty financial commitments, global travel aspirations, in fact whatever required you to have employment stability and continuity right now; would you tell the truth the whole truth and nothing but the truth when questioned. Some will, but I would argue some won’t…… just in case it comes back on them!

So you may not get a true and consistent picture, and those that really need support and intervention might just be the ones that won’t offer up exactly how they feel or what’s not working well internally. You may be in a situation where people just accept what is making them unhappy and carry on less engaged and less productive.

Then think about this. If you could surface the real reasons why people are either leaving or unproductive, and were able to use this to create an optimal level of engagement via an optimal employment ecosystem, the word will get out!

People will tell people how great it is to work at your company, and you will be able to authentically tell them too!

What do I mean? Basically, by fixing your employment ecosystem you will generate some amazing;

  • employer brand messaging,
  • EVP components,
  • ratings on Glassdoor and Indeed,
  • positive brand virility across LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter etc.
  • brand advocates recommending brilliant people to work for you.

All things that are the cornerstone of an optimal attraction strategy. You fix the employment ecosystem, you optimise retention and attraction at the same time!

It doesn’t work the other way around I’m afraid. Upgrading your resourcing strategy to pile people through the front door to a suboptimal employment ecosystem, then hoping they stay and are productive, wastes valuable time, resource and investment

After 20 years in senior resourcing and HR positions, the last two immersed in the psychology of people and retention, I am ideally positioned to provide trusted advice and innovative solutions that go well beyond what has been traditionally available.

Speak soon, I hope.

Colin.